History Of MS

1838 – 1868 First Finding 

An autopsy dating back to 1838 were among the first sightings of MS. The report included detailed images, these images showed what we now know as plaques or scar tissue (caused by inflammation in the central nervous system).

A French professor named Jean-Martin Charcot made an association between another woman’s autopsy. She exhibited tremors, slurred speech, irregular eye movements when alive.

Charcot correctly assumed the lesions made the symptoms happen. But he did not know what caused the mysterious disease. He wanted to describe the disease and give it a name. At that time, he offered no suggestion for treatment.

 

1870’s Official Recognition

In the 1870’s MS was FINALLY recognized as a disease! Two neurologists, Dr. Walter Moxen in England, and Dr. Edward Seguin in New York observed a range of many people.

They learned that MS affects females more than males, that MS isn’t strictly genetic. Also, parents didn’t necessarily pass the disease down to their children.

 
 
 

1930’s Breakthrough

As you all may know the first half of the 20th century saw a boom of medical breakthroughs that helped the medical community study the progression and symptoms of MS. It is now possible to do all those cool things that you could never do before like detect abnormalities in spinal cord fluid.

Dr. Thomas Rivers of New York’s Rockefeller Institute proved through the testing of lab animals that MS is not a viral disease of the immune system.

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society was established in the 1940’s, they continue to support MS.

1960’s The Immune System

Even an idea that MS was linked to the immune system was still being explored throughout the 1940’s and 1950’s. The connection wasn’t made until the next decade.

1960’s the doctors and researchers knew that they had one theory, the immune system attacked the myelin coating of the nerves and acted like an autoimmune disease.

1980’s First MRI for MS

Major technological Advances in magnetic resonance imaging, and it became a useful diagnostic tool for MS. According to an article in Healthline 1981, an MRI was first used to view the brain of someone with MS. This new technology shows damage incurred by MS even when people didn’t experience outward symptoms.

 
 

1990’s Drug Treatments

The 1990’s scientists came out with more effective drug treatments or actually drug treatments in general because before 1990’s there really were not any.

So now they could treat MS more effectively especially now that they know more about it.

 

2000’s: Still, We Fight

It’s still unknown what causes MS or demyelinating lesions but according to Healthline a study in 2012 of Neurology reported that vitamin D may protect against MS. Another study in the Annals of Neurology proposed that oxygen may help prevent damage.

I know I’ve said something about Vitamin D before. I take a lot of Vitamin to boost my moods and to help my MS.

 

 

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society and many other organizations continue to search for treatment/research to improve the quality of life for people with MS.

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9 Best Exercises to Boost Wellness With Multiple Sclerosis

Cardio Workouts

working out in a pool can be a great physical activity for those with MS. Swimming, water walking ans water aerobics can be adapted to a broad range of MS symptoms, from mild to severe. Over heating can worsen MS symptoms, so make sure the water in the pool isn’t too warm. The National Multiple Sclerosis Society recommends a water temperature between 80 and 84 degrees F.

 

Wall Squats: Strength Training

Strength training should be apart of your exercise plan if you have MS, and wall squats will help strengthen your leg muscles. 

  • Stand about a foot from the wall, with your back to the wall.
  • Lean back so your shoulders, torso, and hips are flat against the wall.
  • Slowly slide down the wall about an inch, but not to where your booty is all the way out. Bending your knees and keeping your body flat against the wall so that your knees are parallel (or nearly parallel) to the floor.
  • Hold that position for about 5 seconds and then push with your legs to the starting position.

Begin with about five repetitions until you familiarize yourself with the movements, if you fall down its okay get back up and try again. Just get to familiarize yourself with how far you can go down and come back up with a good form.

If your knees bother you don’t slide down as low.

Hand weights and leg weights can be added to this exercise but I do not recommend them until you get comfortable with what you are doing.  

Modified Plank and Russian Twist: Safer Core Strengthening 

Traditional planks are hard for some people with MS, if they are hard for you try a modified plank (pictured on right.)

  • Lie on your stomach or on a exercise mat, with your elbows close to your sides. Directly under your shoulders, palms down and fingers facing forward. 
  • Engage your Ab/Core muscles, it should feel like you are tightening a corset around your ribs, waist and lower torso.
  • Slowly lift your torso and the upper part of your thighs off the mat, while knees remain on mat.
  • Do not allow your lower back to sag or the hips to lift up in the air.
    • You should remain away from the ears. (if wrist pain is a issue, drop the elbows.)

Try this position a couple of minutes before moving onto an elbow plank so you understand the concept of how to engage your core.

Elbow Plank: Core Strengthening

The abs as well as the shoulders, arms, and legs. If performed on a regular basis, it can even improve your mental focus and make you a stronger person overall.
 

Proper Plank Form:

  • Keep body in a straight line, ears, shoulder, hips. and heels. 
  • Elbows directly under shoulders.
  • Keep stomach muscles and core muscles tight.
  • Squeeze glutes while maintaining correct form.
 
The plank is an isometric exercise, which means it allows you to train your core without moving. This also means its very versatile, since you can do it anywhere, anytime.

 

Glute Bridge: Multi-Muscle Conditioning

This exercise is great for working out your legs, glutes, lower back, and abdominal muscles.

  • Lie on back, with your hands at your sides.
  • Bring your feet in towards your glutes, keep your feet flat on the floor.
  • Contract stomach muscle, pulling your belly button button in towards your spine.
  • Exhale as you lift your hips by tightening your glute muscles. At the top of the movement, your body should form a diagonal line, from your knees to your chest.
  • Pause briefly and then inhale as you restore to the starting position.
  • Work up to 10 to 12 repetitions.

 

Modified Push Up: Strength Training

Let’s be honest: Push-up’s are hard! Especially if you are just getting into a fitness routine, sometimes you don’t have the strength needed to perform a full push-up and that’s okay!

  • Begin in a kneeling position on a mat with hands below shoulders and knees behind hips so back is angled and long.
  • Tuck toes under, tighten abdominals, and bend elbows to lower chest toward floor. Keep your eyes on the front of your fingertips so neck stays long.
  • Press chest back up in start position.
  • Repeat for desired number of repetitions.  

Bicep Curl to Overhead Press: Upper Body Strengthening

Works triceps, chest. shoulders, biceps, and back.

  • Stand with your feet hip-width apart, holding a weight in each hand with your arms in front of your body, palms facing forward. (If two weights is too heavy just use one.)
  • Slowly curl your hands toward your shoulders, squeezing your biceps. Keep your elbow tight to the sides of your body.
  • Rotate the weights so your palms are facing in toward either side of your face. 
  • Press the weights overhead to touch, straightening your elbows completely. Make sure to keep your core engaged and hips tucked under to avoid arching your lower back as you lift your arms.
  • Slowly bend your elbows to lower the weights back down to your shoulders. Then, rotate the weights so your palms are facing toward your body and bring them back to the starting position.
  • Repeat for desired number of repetitions. 10 or 12 Don’t over do it.

Lunges: Lower Body Strengthening 

I’m going to be honest with you guy… My body hates lunges! But they are really good for your body, not only do they help sculpt and tone your lower body, but they also make everyday tasks easier. As one of the basic functional movement patterns. lunges mimic the way we walk, run and climb stairs.

  • Stand with your feet together and your hands by your sides, on your hips, or in prayer position in front of your chest. Step your right leg back keeping both toes facing forward.
  • Bend your left knee, keeping your knee directly over your ankle. Your right heel should be lifted off the ground, your right knee should be hovering above the ground (but not touching it) keep your abs tight and lean your chest forward slightly to work your glutes.
  • Hold for one to two seconds, then return to standing position. 
  • Repeat 10 to 15 times alternating sides.

Calf Raises: Balance Training 

It works the calf muscles and the two muscles that attach the heal bone via your Achilles tendon – and the plantaris, that tendon that most of us know as plantar fasciitis. This move is great to improve ankle stability, strength, and subsequently overall balance.

  •  Stand on flat surface with your toes pointed straight ahead.
  • Lift your heels off the floor to flex calf muscle.
  • Pause for a moment.
  • Then slowly return to the floor, in starting position.
  • Repeat
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Disease Modifying Therapies

As we have talked about everyone MS is not the same. However, DMTs could be a helpful component in your MS care. Keep in mind, DMTs don’t treat symptoms of MS, but they may reduce the number of relapses and slow the progression of physical disability.

Even if you may not be experiencing MS symptoms regularly, your MS may still be progressing. It’s important to work with your doctor to discuss a treatment option that meets your need sooner than later….

Explore Disease Modifying Treatments for MS 
  • Alemtuzumab (Lemtrada)
  • Avonex (Interferon beta-1a)
  • Betaferon (Interferon beta-1b)
  • Cladribine (Mavenclad)
  • Dimethyl fumarate (Tecfidera)
  • Extavia (beta interferon-1b) 
  • Fingolimod (Gilenya)
  • Glatiramer acetate (Copaxone)
  • HSCT
  • Natalizumab (Tysabri)
  • Ocrelizumab (Ocrevus)
  • Plegridy (peginterferon beta-1a)
  • Rebif (beta interferon-1a)
  • Siponimon (Mayzen)
  • Teriflunomide (Aubagio)
To learn more click on the ribbon…
Contact Me!
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COVID risks

MS and the Pandemic

 

Have you?

Have you ever asked yourself what kind of risk you are in? Especially if you are taking disease modifying therapies? (DMTs)

Experience In MS patients with COVID-19

There was a case study done where MS patients taking (DMTs), by far the most cases were described when taking anti-CD20 treatment (n=317). The mortality rate of all MS patients was 4% and a further 3% required invasive or non-invasive ventilation. When looking at the severe and fatal cases, it is particularly noticeable that patients without DMTs, with previous cardiovascular diseases, or with a severe degree disability are at risk. Immunosuppressive therapy itself did not appear to be a substantial risk factor.  

Anxiety

Studies show that the COVID-19 pandemic is having an impact on psychological health of patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) The researchers found that the main concerns among patients were that someone they know could be infected with COVID-19 or could die from the infection, as well as the lack of specific treatment options. Regarding RRMS status, the main concerns were that their disease would be worse if they contract COVID-19, that they might experience some difficulties in drug availability, and that they could not go to the hospital as usual.  

Treating Disease With Virtual Reality

Today, close to 1 million adults in the united states have been diagnosed with MS. During the COVID-19 pandemic patients have found themselves doing Virtual Reality for doctors appointments. Virtual reality and augmented reality (VR/AR), which were once thought of as simple gamification, have been adopted be medical professionals around the world. Patients can remotely engage with clinicians, where they can be guided with a treatment plan that is personalized.
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COVID-19 vaccine

MS patients and COVID vaccine

HOW WILL THE VACCINE AFFECT PEOPLE WITH MS? According to Vanderbilt Multiple Sclerosis clinic, both Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are safe as they are non-live vaccines, meaning you cannot get COVID from the vaccines. However, the Pfizer vaccines have shown more allergic reactions during the trials, so patients with many allergies or a history of allergic reactions to vaccines are being cautioned. If that’s your case it’s recommended waiting on Moderna’s vaccines.   WHAT IF YOU’RE IMMUNOSUPPRESSED? Now with immunosuppressed patients, there is a question on how effective the vaccine will be as the immune system cannot mount as strong of a response and as high level of immunity. The original studies were done on “healthy adults” without other illnesses or medications needed. So if you want to get the vaccine make sure your MS medicine does not cause immunosuppression. ( EX. Tysabri does not)   ARE YOU GOING TO GET THE VACCINE? I want comments! Biden is going to get the vaccine we know Trump probably isn’t. What is your decision? My MS specialist Dr. Pawate from Vanderbilt MS clinic told me it wasn’t a bad idea for me to get it. I am in health care and I myself have multiple sclerosis. So I went and received the Pfizer the 30th of January my only symptoms were, I was very sleepy for about two days, and my arm hurt for about the same amount of time. Now I’ve heard some people have had no symptoms and some have I guess it’s just your immune system. I would recommend asking your doctor before getting the vaccine.    

Symptoms

Most common symptoms include:
  • Dry cough
  • Tiredness
  • Fever
Less Common symptoms:
  • Aches and pains
  • Sore throat
  • Diarrhea
  • Conjunctivitis
  • Headache
  • Loss of taste or smell
  • A rash on skin, or discoloration of fingers or toes
Serious symptoms:
  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Chest pain or pressure
  • Loss or speech or movement
  On average it takes up to 5-6 days from when someone is infected with virus for symptoms to show, however it can take up to 14 days.    
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What is Multiple sclerosis (MS)? What are the symptoms?

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What happens in MS? Is everyone’s MS the same?

Your immune system is your body’s natural defense system which helps your body fight against infections.

Your central nervous system contains nerve cells that process information and communicate messages to and from different areas of your body triggering a response, it controls EVERYTHING that goes on in your body,

If you have MS you’ve probably heard the word “myelin sheath” well that’s the coating that covers your nerve ending and well us guys with MS are losing it! That’s what’s causes our lesions in our brains and spinal cords.

When our “myelin sheath” is damaged or degenerated, the process of nerve signals get hampered or delayed,

You all know we used to be fast at something but now you will realize someone in the corner whispering ” That person is just too slow” or some snide remark. 

After an attack, your body is able to repair itself to some extent, However in the earlier stages of MS, your body has the ability to replace the damaged myelin (called demyelination), although it tends to be thinner than unaffected myelin so the messages may not travel as fast as they did before. Your brain also has the ability to reroute messages to avoid an area of damage so that messages can still get through – this is known as plasticity.

MS is thought to be an autoimmune and neurodegenerative condition. Autoimmune because your body is attacking healthy cells and neurodegenerative because the loss of myelin can leave nerves exposed and more vulnerable to long-lasting damage.

 

Is everyone’s MS the same?

No, everyone’s MS is different. MS is divided into three main types:

Most Neuros like to use just two groups of MS relapsing – remitting and primary – progressive MS 

Sometimes there can be some doubt as to which type you have, especially when you’re first diagnosed.

If you do not know what kind of MS you have you can always ask your Neuro or your MS specialist 

If you need any help or information, Please put your contact down.

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